IDEM 2022: 7 - 9 October 2022

We begin our life journey with no teeth, and it was accepted that we complete our life journey edentulous. This may have been the norm maybe 20 years ago, but not today. The Dental Profession plays an important role in ensuring quality of life for individuals, especially in the later years. Eating, speaking and generally feeling good about one’s appearance is intrinsically linked to having good dentition. In the 8020 campaign which promotes having at least 20 teeth present at the age of 80, is a goal that we as the dental profession should endeavour to achieve for our population. Proper planning on a national level involving dentists, oral health therapists and dental support staff is crucial to ensure acceptable quality of care in oral health from birth to the end of life. 


Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

In my daily work as a General Practitioner, the proper and quick diagnosis is essential for every case to provide ideal treatment. Most cases could be diagnosed by routine examination and 2D images, but some cases are not. In that situation, the clear 3D images will be needed for making a final decision.  Having a system that provides us precise and high-quality images with low dose is important. These images become the gold-standard solution for trauma, auto-transplantation, endodontics, orthodontics, periodontology, oral surgery and dental implants in my career. In my lecture, I would like to share several cases through the planning, treatment and prognoses using CBCT images. 

Learning Objectives:

  • How can we use CBCT for daily work? 
  • The importance of precise imaging for Implantology and traumatology for diagnosis and prognosis. 
  • How low-dose and high resolution CBCT helps doctor & patient life. 

CBCT machines are becoming increasingly ubiquitous in clinical practice. However, the benefits of this 3D imaging technology are not fully maximised if users are not familiar with adjusting CBCT settings or interpreting the CBCT volumes that they acquire. This course aims to provide relevant clinical tips for acquisition and viewing, and a review of CBCT anatomy and interpretation. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to learn how to use the OnDemand3D CBCT viewing software during the hands-on workshop.

Learning Objectives:

  • How to decide on Field-of-Views (FOVs) and voxel size settings for various clinical indications and impact on radiation dose
  • Identification of anatomic landmarks on CBCT
  • How to use CBCT for interpretation and treatment planning
  • Common pathology as seen on CBCT
  • How to use the OnDemand3D viewer software, including nerve tracing

Periodontitis is the major cause of tooth loss in adults which will have a direct impact on a person’s masticatory function, nutrition and aesthetic appearance which are all linked to a person’s quality of life (QoL). This presentation will discuss how periodontal disease impacts the various conceptual domains of QoL based on the latest scientific evidence, as well as assessing the current instruments used for measuring this relationship. An in-depth analysis on the clinical application of such a health status measure in our daily clinical practice will also be discussed, with special emphasis on its relevance from an Oral Health Therapist’s perspective.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Understanding how periodontal disease can impact quality of life 
  • Understand the different QoL instruments that are currently available to evaluate its impact and the rationale for creating a disease specific instrument
  • Appreciate the clinical relevance of assessing disease impact on patient’s QoL in our daily practice

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

Advancement in digital technologies over the past decade has revolutionised the way restorative dentistry is practiced. Not only has it made procedures more predictable and less complex it has also increased accuracy and reduced errors in the delivery of quality complex aesthetic work.

It is all more evident in full mouth reconstruction where digital dentistry has improved the approach to treatment, from patient communication to treatment planning and execution. In this presentation, Dr. Ronnie will share how he uses a myriad of digital tools in managing complex restorative cases.

Learning Objectives:

  • Use of photography and videography in aesthetic planning and case communication
  • Role of Intra Oral scanning in the pre-restorative and restorative phase of treatment
  • Digital tools to enhance bite management and occlusion
  • Application of digital tools in complex aesthetic rehabilitation cases

The role of the oral health therapist continues to evolve as Singapore enters a rapidly ageing society. By 2035, one third of Singaporeans will be aged 65 and above. This demographic shift places pressure on our society with a shrinking workforce supporting an ageing population. The medical complexities, compounded with its social intricacies, will pose in managing the oral health of the aged in the community and intermediate long-term care (ILTC) facilities. The talk will focus on the research that has been done in other developed countries on the roles that the oral health therapist can play in this new landscape, and how this can be translated to the local healthcare setting. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Understanding the challenges in managing the geriatric population, in the medical and social domains
  • Understanding how the oral health therapist can contribute to the oral care of the seniors in the community and ILTC sectors

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

Chairside digital dentistry is already a reality, and it all begins with an intraoral scan. Within dental care, several fundamental and mutually reinforcing trends drive deep structural changes and embracing advanced digital solutions has become imperative to stay ahead of the competition.

Digital Dentistry is much more than just a scanner in your practice. In our lecture we will show, how digital dentistry can improve the dentist’s daily work and patient’s wellbeing and how it will lead the dentist step by step into a fully digital future. All the daily workflows from diagnosis, documentation and monitoring to restorative, ortho & aligner treatment, prosthetics and implants, from chairside to Labside partnership is a journey full of excitement and adventure leading to beautiful smiles of your patients. Let’s see how these advanced solutions will eventually be delivering quantifiable benefits for dentists, technicians and – most importantly – patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • A Journey of a Thousand Smiles begins with an Intraoral Scanner – Choice of intraoral scanner as team player
  • Understand the digital workflows and their importance in day-to-day practice.
  • Understand the difference between chairside and laboratory workflow – What works best for your practice!
  • Understand the efficient ways to practice digital dentistry.
  • New CAD/CAM materials to fabricate a chairside CAD/CAM restorations
  • Indicate different materials and techniques and cementation protocols for long term success of restorations.

Chairside digital dentistry is already a reality, and it all begins with an intraoral scan. Within dental care, several fundamental and mutually reinforcing trends drive deep structural changes and embracing advanced digital solutions has become imperative to stay ahead of the competition.

Digital Dentistry is much more than just a scanner in your practice. In our lecture we will show, how digital dentistry can improve the dentist’s daily work and patient’s wellbeing and how it will lead the dentist step by step into a fully digital future. All the daily workflows from diagnosis, documentation and monitoring to restorative, ortho & aligner treatment, prosthetics and implants, from chairside to Labside partnership is a journey full of excitement and adventure leading to beautiful smiles of your patients. Let’s see how these advanced solutions will eventually be delivering quantifiable benefits for dentists, technicians and – most importantly – patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • A Journey of a Thousand Smiles begins with an Intraoral Scanner – Choice of intraoral scanner as team player
  • Understand the digital workflows and their importance in day-to-day practice.
  • Understand the difference between chairside and laboratory workflow – What works best for your practice!
  • Understand the efficient ways to practice digital dentistry.
  • New CAD/CAM materials to fabricate a chairside CAD/CAM restorations
  • Indicate different materials and techniques and cementation protocols for long term success of restorations.

Oral health therapists (OHTs) in schools, public institutions or private practices, work closely with children and young persons. Therefore, they are dental professionals with a pivotal role in child protection. In 2021, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of Singapore child abuse cases reached the highest in the past decade. There are key changes in the local child protection system in recent years, especially 2021. It is therefore imperative to update the dental team including dentists, OHTs, dental therapists, hygienists, and dental assistants.  

In the UK, safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults is mandatory training for dentists, with refreshers every 3 years. Like other UK paediatric dentists/trainees, Ruixiang completed the Child Protection Training (Levels 1, 2, and 3) during his training at Guy’s, King’s and St Thomas’ hospitals. At KK Women’s and Children Hospital (KKH), he works closely with the medical team, social workers and at times, the MSF Child Protection Officers, to attend to the oral care needs of children with child abuse, neglect, complex social background or medical/special needs. Therefore, he will provide an overview of what child protection and child abuses entails, key updates in the local Child Protection scene, and insights from his learning/work experience in both UK and Singapore. Recognising that >50% of physically abused children may have orofacial signs, he believes firmly that while the dental team is not responsible for making a diagnosis of child abuse, we should share concerns appropriately.  

Using pictures and animations, Ruixiang aims to make this talk informative as well as relatable and understandable for the audience. He hopes this will inspire the OHTs in Singapore and the region to be another voice for vulnerable children.  

Learning Objectives: 

  • Be introduced to the concept of child protection and types of child abuses 
  • Local child protection updates including the hotline for reporting 
  • Appreciate why is it everyone’s responsibility: Dentists, OHTs, receptionists, DSAs, etc. 

Often dentists see themselves as “working in the dark” whenever they have to perform a root canal or an endodontic procedure. Not only is the canal anatomy not completely obvious even with conventional radiographs, even the diagnosis can be befuddling when clinical and radiographic evidence do not appear to sync or match.
The many advantages of Cone Beam CT or CBCT have been publicised ad nausea. Its use in endodontics, however, have been considerably less widespread than in prosthodontic and surgical planning. CBCT is capable of being a serious force multiplier in endodontic diagnosis, planning, treatment, and evaluation. It brings tremendous predictability and confidence to patients towards the outcome of their treatment.
This presentation and workshop serves to share prevailing evidence and tips on how to leverage on CBCT equipment and capabilities to make endodontic outcomes even more predictable, and perhaps even have fun doing so.

Dental caries is a preventable non-communicable disease and the causal biological mechanisms have been established in the literature. In this presentation the individual, family and community social influences of dental caries in children will be explained in a conceptual framework. A holistic view of the complexities of children’s oral health will be explained to guide clinicians, future research and promote collaboration for the betterment of children’s oral health. Understanding the social complexities will be linked to modern approaches of prevention with Silver Fluoride and the practical application for child patients. Silver fluoride products for caries prevention and atraumatic management of caries will be overviewed and the practical use of these products for clinicians outlined.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Appreciate population oral health and prevalence of dental caries in Children 
  • Apply the social factors to understand dental caries in children 
  • Understand and identify the pathophysiological aspects of dental caries 
  • Understand the patient and practitioners’ roles in maintaining health and conservative caries management
  • Understand the current evidence for the use of silver fluoride for dental caries stabilisation 

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects

Patients with missing teeth in the “aesthetic zone” may present with severe hard and soft tissue loss. While many techniques offer excellent results for reconstruction of these defects, few can be said to guarantee success. A bone augmentation procedure to correct a vertical defect in the aesthetic zone that is not fully successful in correcting the defect often ensures the use of prosthetic pink. This leads to the treatment dilemma: “if we have to use a little pink, why not use a lot of pink” and spare the patient the painful bone augmentation in the first place? The aim of this lecture is to critically evaluate the current evidence to determine the predictability of various bone augmentation techniques for vertical ridge defects for implant placement and when to consider more conservative alternative treatment options.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the methods for vertical bone augmentation in the anterior maxilla
  • Understand the limitations of augmentation and implant replacement of multiple missing teeth in the aesthetic zone
  • Discuss surgical approaches to prepare the anterior maxilla for the prosthetic solution to defect management

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