IDEM 2022: 7 - 9 October 2022

Technology is shaping the future with essential information and innovative ideas. The orthodontic field, with hardware, software and humans combined, is rapidly changing, probably faster than at any time in its history. If you believe that people are the most valuable asset to your business, then you have to communicate, plan, and be consistent. 

Learning Objectives:  

  • Understand the digital flow with clear aligner therapy 
  • Evaluate critically case selection 
  • Develop your skill set to communicate with colleagues and patients 
  • Interpret predictability with digital orthodontics 
  • Recognize the importance of retention 

With increasing demands by patients for aesthetic and functional materials, it is imperative for today’s clinicians to understand the diversity of materials available as well as the clinical indications and limitations in practice. The application of composite resin in restoration of teeth can be a rewarding treatment option providing conservative and economical solutions for our patients. Dr. Ho will share step-by-step procedures allowing the participant to master direct resin restorations. This course is a mixture of lecture and workshop giving attendees practical hands-on experience. Attendees will take home techniques learnt and immediately adopt these to their practice.

Learning Objectives:

  • To perform predictable adhesive procedures
  • Understand the selection of shade for different materials.
  • Describe the optical behaviour of teeth
  • Utilise different opacities of composite resin to sculpt a multilayered restoration replicating natural aesthetics
  • Visualise the anatomical form and morphology of teeth
  • To learn simplified and predictable techniques in direct placement
  • Optimal posterior contacts with correct contours
  • Be able to finish and polish composite resin to reveal a lustre-like finish

Dental Implants are no longer perceived as metal constructions passively anchored in bone. On the contrary, implants are shown to be biologically active systems, which constantly interact with human tissue and microbes, supporting function and aesthetics in a delicate balance between biology and technology. It is exactly this interrelation between living tissue and precisely constructed biomaterials that determines long term success or complications. In no other part is this interrelation more crucial than within the Supracrestal Complex.   

Possibly one of the most complex man-made ecosystems, the Supracrestal Complex is the tiny space defined by the cortical Marginal Bone (apically) and the first couple of mm of the implant prosthesis exposed in the oral environment (coronally). It’s no more than 200 square mm, but this tiny space packs 3 out of the 4 tissues of the human body, at least 3 mechanical constructions (implant, abutment, abutment screw, prosthesis), more than 300 types of human cells and countless numbers of bacterial species. 

The Supracrestal Complex is a true “cyborg” organ: it includes all 3 key players: Human Tissue, Mechanical parts and Bacteria in a constant dynamic interplay. As recent studies have pointed out, this tiny space is the source of the most common implant long-term complications of both the biological and the technical type. Proper design coupled with a careful individualized maintenance scheme and daily practice of oral hygiene from the patient are the keys to ensure long term successful clinical outcomes! 

In this presentation, we will identify the interactions that take place in the Supracrestal Complex, we will discuss the latest evidence of design features and conditions that give rise to the most common problems and finally identify the strategies for prevention or early identification of Mucositis and Peri-implantitis.  

Learning Objectives:

  • What is the Implant Supracrestal complex and what are the key elements and design features with clinical importance
  • How the design of the Implant-prosthesis -abutment complex can predispose to or protect from biological complications and peri-implant tissue inflammation
  • How can we devise individualized maintenance strategies and use professional and patient driven maintenance to ensure long term success and health of the peri-implant tissues 

The dental implants penetration rate into the dental industry has been increasing at an exponential rate over the last 20 years since its inception nearly 60 years ago. However, the technology of implants, techniques and how we deliver care have been evolving and is now at an extremely exciting era.

With the advancement of technology, this lecture will discuss how it has changed the practice of immediacy. Has it really improved our way of practice? Is it time to jump in and invest into technology? What are the main benefits and how do we find balance? The differences of the traditional and the digital way of practice will be illustrated in this lecture.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the differences between digital workflow and traditional workflow on immediacy
  • Learn how to incorporate digital dentistry into your practice for implant dentistry
  • Learn the clinical steps to practicing immediacy with a digital workflow

In this Super Impactful hands-on session, doctors will get the chance to practice bracket placement protocols under the supervision of Dr. Borgan and Dr. Rami. There will also be a chance for a demo for TADs insertion and Deprogrammer placement on the anterior and posterior teeth. Basically, all the tools you need to create a great smile for your patients.


Successful long-term results in oral implantology rely on a solid treatment plan and the application of rational surgical and prosthetic concepts. Guided implant placement integrates the digital transition in implant surgery; accuracy and predictability highlights digital implantology as a powerful and indispensable instrument for the contemporary clinical practice. Guided surgery is predictable and faster to execute; additionally, it provides a very comfortable recovering period for our patients. This lecture aims to highlight the effects of digitization on various aspects of prosthodontic treatment and the advantages it has over conventional techniques, thus focusing on reproducible digital implant concepts for optimal surgical and prosthetic long-term results.

Learning Objectives:

  • This presentation will highlight the principles of guided implantology, various stages of the protocol, as well as advantages and limitations of guide manufacturing
  • Selecting the virtual implant position, length and axis will be discussed
  • Clinical guidelines on the performance of CAD/CAM monolithic implant-supported ceramic restorations, from single tooth restoration to cross-arch, will be extensively discussed

Designing and creating Smiles involves certain attitude, technical competence, artistic ability and intuition. It necessitates the development of skills to balance illusion with the reality to attain the highest level of clinical success. Some restorations we do look great and attractive than some, even though the work was technically good. Of all the procedures necessary to accomplish better results, it is important to understand the architectural development and the fundamentals of creating a pleasing restoration. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Learn to distinguish between a laminate and a veneer and when and how to opt for a laminate or veneer in a given situation. 
  • Learn how to do a multi-chromatic laminate/ veneer ad to create illusions by shading and shaping. 
  • Learn to finish and polish the restoration for the desired result. 

Emerging evidence points towards significant interrelations between the condition of the peri-implant tissue and the implant-abutment-prosthesis complex. A new paradigm is essential, where the peri-implant tissues will be analysed in close interrelation with the implant, abutment and prosthesis complex, under the presence of oral biofilm. The aim of this course is to make the participant familiar with the concept of the “Implant Supra-crestal Complex” (ISC) and describe the critical elements that define it as a unique anatomic, and functional system of human tissues, mechanical components and oral bacteria / biofilm.

The course reveals recent evidence to identify the impact of design features on both short-term clinical outcomes, as well as on the long-term health of the peri-implant bone and soft tissues. Prosthetic-driven implant placement is the prerequisite for the proper design of the ISC, which in turn can indirectly influence the structure and dimensions of the peri-implant soft tissues. Design features of the implant-prosthesis abutment complex such as the Emergence Profile (EP), Emergence Angle (EA) and Cervical Margin (CM), as well as the design of the implant-abutment and abutment-prosthesis junctions and their location in relation to the tissues of the ISC can have significant impact in the maintenance of stable and healthy peri-implant tissues in the long term.

At the end of this course the participant will be able to understand how to properly manage the ISC in order to establish the foundation for long term stability and reduce the incidence of cases affected by peri-implantitis.


As digital technology is progressing at a fast pace, every dental practitioner must be up to date. Nowadays, there is a variety of IOS on the market and choosing the right one for you is a challenge.

The CAMEO Intraoral Scanner is the most convenient and efficient multi-tool for various applications like diagnostics, patient education, and digital impression taking.

Accessibility of The Cameo IOS allows every dental office to enter the digital world.

Learning Objectives: 

  • Every digital protocol starts with an accurate and precise scan. Beginner or experienced, a proper pathway of scanning procedures will add confidence and best results of the final restoration.
  • Taking advantage of features of AI will help bring your practice to another level.
  • Practical usage of chairside protocols in everyday practice.

Successful long-term results in oral implantology rely on a solid treatment plan and the application of rational surgical and prosthetic concepts. Guided implant placement integrates the digital transition in implant surgery; accuracy and predictability highlights digital implantology as a powerful and indispensable instrument for the contemporary clinical practice. Guided surgery is predictable and faster to execute; additionally, it provides a very comfortable recovering period for our patients. This lecture aims to highlight the effects of digitization on various aspects of prosthodontic treatment and the advantages it has over conventional techniques, thus focusing on reproducible digital implant concepts for optimal surgical and prosthetic long-term results.

Learning Objectives:

  • This presentation will highlight the principles of guided implantology, various stages of the protocol, as well as advantages and limitations of guide manufacturing
  • Selecting the virtual implant position, length and axis will be discussed
  • Clinical guidelines on the performance of CAD/CAM monolithic implant-supported ceramic restorations, from single tooth restoration to cross-arch, will be extensively discussed

The increasing demand for the most beautiful restorations requires use of adhesion and understanding the material selections to achieve optimal results. Knowledge of the optical properties of teeth and restorative materials along with their strengths and limitations allow clinicians to provide aesthetic excellence. The ability to blend restorations harmoniously is a cornerstone of modern dental practice, and attaining beautiful results with longevity and predictability lead to long term success. This lecture will explain the materials we need in our armamentarium and the different adhesive protocols one requires for both direct and indirect restorations. 


Digital technology in dentistry is rapidly evolving and this improves our daily workflow routines. CAD-CAM chairside systems are one of the most beneficial. Its superiority and ease of use results in a much more predictable and accurate final restoration. Covering a broad spectrum of indications while also avoiding multiple appointments not only simplifies everything for the dental office, but the patient with a simple digital intraoral scan experiences an easy treatment. The concept of a one-day treatment is becoming a standard benchmark in dentistry. Full ceramics and composites have proven as the best material of choice along with the designing software that allows us to be predictable, and accurate in a very short time frame.

Learning Objectives:

  • Simple protocol in dental CAD-CAM systems – from scanning to milling
  • Indications for one-day patient treatment
  • Choice of material

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

In my daily work as a General Practitioner, the proper and quick diagnosis is essential for every case to provide ideal treatment. Most cases could be diagnosed by routine examination and 2D images, but some cases are not. In that situation, the clear 3D images will be needed for making a final decision.  Having a system that provides us precise and high-quality images with low dose is important. These images become the gold-standard solution for trauma, auto-transplantation, endodontics, orthodontics, periodontology, oral surgery and dental implants in my career. In my lecture, I would like to share several cases through the planning, treatment and prognoses using CBCT images. 

Learning Objectives:

  • How can we use CBCT for daily work? 
  • The importance of precise imaging for Implantology and traumatology for diagnosis and prognosis. 
  • How low-dose and high resolution CBCT helps doctor & patient life. 

CBCT machines are becoming increasingly ubiquitous in clinical practice. However, the benefits of this 3D imaging technology are not fully maximised if users are not familiar with adjusting CBCT settings or interpreting the CBCT volumes that they acquire. This course aims to provide relevant clinical tips for acquisition and viewing, and a review of CBCT anatomy and interpretation. Additionally, participants will have the opportunity to learn how to use the OnDemand3D CBCT viewing software during the hands-on workshop.

Learning Objectives:

  • How to decide on Field-of-Views (FOVs) and voxel size settings for various clinical indications and impact on radiation dose
  • Identification of anatomic landmarks on CBCT
  • How to use CBCT for interpretation and treatment planning
  • Common pathology as seen on CBCT
  • How to use the OnDemand3D viewer software, including nerve tracing

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

Advancement in digital technologies over the past decade has revolutionised the way restorative dentistry is practiced. Not only has it made procedures more predictable and less complex it has also increased accuracy and reduced errors in the delivery of quality complex aesthetic work.

It is all more evident in full mouth reconstruction where digital dentistry has improved the approach to treatment, from patient communication to treatment planning and execution. In this presentation, Dr. Ronnie will share how he uses a myriad of digital tools in managing complex restorative cases.

Learning Objectives:

  • Use of photography and videography in aesthetic planning and case communication
  • Role of Intra Oral scanning in the pre-restorative and restorative phase of treatment
  • Digital tools to enhance bite management and occlusion
  • Application of digital tools in complex aesthetic rehabilitation cases

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects 

Chairside digital dentistry is already a reality, and it all begins with an intraoral scan. Within dental care, several fundamental and mutually reinforcing trends drive deep structural changes and embracing advanced digital solutions has become imperative to stay ahead of the competition.

Digital Dentistry is much more than just a scanner in your practice. In our lecture we will show, how digital dentistry can improve the dentist’s daily work and patient’s wellbeing and how it will lead the dentist step by step into a fully digital future. All the daily workflows from diagnosis, documentation and monitoring to restorative, ortho & aligner treatment, prosthetics and implants, from chairside to Labside partnership is a journey full of excitement and adventure leading to beautiful smiles of your patients. Let’s see how these advanced solutions will eventually be delivering quantifiable benefits for dentists, technicians and – most importantly – patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • A Journey of a Thousand Smiles begins with an Intraoral Scanner – Choice of intraoral scanner as team player
  • Understand the digital workflows and their importance in day-to-day practice.
  • Understand the difference between chairside and laboratory workflow – What works best for your practice!
  • Understand the efficient ways to practice digital dentistry.
  • New CAD/CAM materials to fabricate a chairside CAD/CAM restorations
  • Indicate different materials and techniques and cementation protocols for long term success of restorations.

Chairside digital dentistry is already a reality, and it all begins with an intraoral scan. Within dental care, several fundamental and mutually reinforcing trends drive deep structural changes and embracing advanced digital solutions has become imperative to stay ahead of the competition.

Digital Dentistry is much more than just a scanner in your practice. In our lecture we will show, how digital dentistry can improve the dentist’s daily work and patient’s wellbeing and how it will lead the dentist step by step into a fully digital future. All the daily workflows from diagnosis, documentation and monitoring to restorative, ortho & aligner treatment, prosthetics and implants, from chairside to Labside partnership is a journey full of excitement and adventure leading to beautiful smiles of your patients. Let’s see how these advanced solutions will eventually be delivering quantifiable benefits for dentists, technicians and – most importantly – patients.

Learning Objectives:

  • A Journey of a Thousand Smiles begins with an Intraoral Scanner – Choice of intraoral scanner as team player
  • Understand the digital workflows and their importance in day-to-day practice.
  • Understand the difference between chairside and laboratory workflow – What works best for your practice!
  • Understand the efficient ways to practice digital dentistry.
  • New CAD/CAM materials to fabricate a chairside CAD/CAM restorations
  • Indicate different materials and techniques and cementation protocols for long term success of restorations.

Often dentists see themselves as “working in the dark” whenever they have to perform a root canal or an endodontic procedure. Not only is the canal anatomy not completely obvious even with conventional radiographs, even the diagnosis can be befuddling when clinical and radiographic evidence do not appear to sync or match.
The many advantages of Cone Beam CT or CBCT have been publicised ad nausea. Its use in endodontics, however, have been considerably less widespread than in prosthodontic and surgical planning. CBCT is capable of being a serious force multiplier in endodontic diagnosis, planning, treatment, and evaluation. It brings tremendous predictability and confidence to patients towards the outcome of their treatment.
This presentation and workshop serves to share prevailing evidence and tips on how to leverage on CBCT equipment and capabilities to make endodontic outcomes even more predictable, and perhaps even have fun doing so.

Subjects with missing teeth and periodontitis can benefit from the use of dental implants. Control of periodontitis and maintenance care are pre-requisite. Specific actions are needed to ensure success over time: i) implant and reconstruction design to ensure self-performed and professional plaque control and maintenance of tissue health, ii) precise implant placement (periodontally driven implant placement).  

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the importance of appropriate periodontal therapy before implant placement
  • Understand the benefits and risks of biological complications in stage III and IV periodontitis patients
  • Identify specific approaches to decrease the risk of peri-implantitis in these high-risk subjects

Patients with missing teeth in the “aesthetic zone” may present with severe hard and soft tissue loss. While many techniques offer excellent results for reconstruction of these defects, few can be said to guarantee success. A bone augmentation procedure to correct a vertical defect in the aesthetic zone that is not fully successful in correcting the defect often ensures the use of prosthetic pink. This leads to the treatment dilemma: “if we have to use a little pink, why not use a lot of pink” and spare the patient the painful bone augmentation in the first place? The aim of this lecture is to critically evaluate the current evidence to determine the predictability of various bone augmentation techniques for vertical ridge defects for implant placement and when to consider more conservative alternative treatment options.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the methods for vertical bone augmentation in the anterior maxilla
  • Understand the limitations of augmentation and implant replacement of multiple missing teeth in the aesthetic zone
  • Discuss surgical approaches to prepare the anterior maxilla for the prosthetic solution to defect management

Our oral structures undergo tremendous amounts of mechanical, chemical and biological insults daily. It can lead to loss of function, pain and even compromised self-esteem especially when the smile and appearance become negatively affected.

When faced with such a patient, we need to be able to assess, plan and treat the patient comprehensively. The restoration of function and form must encompass all aspects of dentistry utilising concepts of Digital Smile Design, Occlusal concepts, and excellent lab communication. Most importantly, patients must be able to participate in and appreciate the process of their rehabilitation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the process of treatment planning for complex aesthetics rehabilitation.
  • Expose participants to Digital Smile Design and Gneuromuscular Occlusion concepts.
  • Appreciate digital integration in comprehensive aesthetic rehabilitation.

In modern Implantology, like in Orthopedics and Regenerative Medicine, our aim is to restore the form and function of the lost bone, so that we can give back to our patients exactly the same tissue, a healthy bone tissue which can remodel and adapt to the transmitting occlusal forces.

The new generation of novel alloplastic grafting materials may elicit a controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by new bone. As surgeons, if bone regeneration is the aim of our treatment, a fully resorbable material should be used so that the newly formed bone will be in all ways identical to the lost host bone and no residual graft should be present in the long term. Long-term incorporation of non-resorbable graft particles in the augmented bone leads to incomplete regeneration, so in these cases repair or bone augmentation are more appropriate terms.

Novel synthetic biomaterials are designed to be not only osteoconductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate the differentiation of multipotent cells towards osteoblasts capable of depositing bone matrix, and there are currently numerous medical research papers showing this. All this medical research can teach us how to engineer functional bone in Dentistry and Implantology, we can learn and understand the role of periosteum, the importance of angiogenesis and biomechanics, so that we translate this knowledge into clinical applications for the benefit of our patients. This in turn increases patient satisfaction, with treatments being completed without the use of donor material, with minimal pain / discomfort and with a reduced timespan.



Indirect Ceramic restorations are among the most prevalent restorative procedures used in dentistry. These types of restorations are indicated for a wide variety of clinical situations both to improve the aesthetics and to improve the function of the dentition. The clinical situations can range from restoring heavily damaged, heavily restored, or cracked teeth to improving aesthetic or positional situations.  

There are a number of ceramic materials available in the market today having different compositions and methods of fabrication and their clinical selection depends on the functional and aesthetic demands of the case.  

Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on the longevity and the aesthetic results of these indirect restorations. And of all the clinical steps, cementation is one of the most critical. 

Proper cement selection plays a determinative role in providing long-term serviceability, retention, caries prevention, and patient satisfaction. 

The goal of this lecture is to help clinicians make appropriate cementation decisions in selecting the most appropriate cement and cementation protocol so as to maximise the aesthetics and the functional demands of our ceramic restorations.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to select the correct cement for a specific type of ceramic 
  • Understand the clinical steps involved in the cementation protocols for different ceramics. 
  • Understand the aesthetic and strength characteristics for different types of cements to maximise the success of your cementation.  

The end goal of successful orthodontic treatment is to achieve good clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction. The first and arguably most important step in this process is to understand and address the treatment objectives of our patients. This is central to any well-crafted treatment plan.

After which, clinicians are required to think broadly about topics such as treatment modality, facial aesthetics and biomechanics before finalising the treatment plan with their patients. Case selection and knowing when to refer the patient for specialist management are also critical steps in the decision tree.

This lecture aims to add structure to this complex process by discussing six key areas:

  1. Clinical evaluation: Pre-treatment and mid-treatment
  2. Growth modification & Camouflage treatment vs Orthognathic Surgery
  3. Extraction vs Non extraction therapy
  4. Fixed braces vs Clear aligners
  5. Multidisciplinary treatment plans
  6. Psychosocial considerations

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Patient Centric Orthodontics
  • Extraction versus Non extraction Orthodontics
  • Fixed braces or Clear Aligners

There are probably more controversies written on the management of ameloblastoma than for any other jaw lesions. Ameloblastoma in the jaw is accepted as a locally aggressive tumour, predominantly in the young and young adults.

Jaw resection is a widely accepted approach to treating ameloblastoma.

Preserving the involved part of the jaw and the involved teeth in the treatment of ameloblastoma is almost a heresy to conventional wisdom and is a patient’s dilemma.

This paper presents treatment and follow up of cases treated by non-resection and offered as a viable treatment option.

The rationale of case selection and treatment protocol will be presented and discussed with cases treated and follow-up for over 30-year period.

This presentation is a documentation that in selected cases, our young ameloblastoma patients can have an option to retain their involved jaws and teeth during the most productive phase of their lives. Herein lies the dentist’s enigma.


The expectation that dental restorations should be aesthetic, durable and minimally invasive is becoming the common expectation among patients who are increasingly well informed. The utilisation of all-ceramic systems, especially Lithium Disilicate, have rapidly become the standard and the cornerstone modality in meeting these expectations.  

The goal of this presentation is to demonstrate the treatment planning and execution of these modalities of treatment, from the simple everyday cases to the more complex and challenging cases. The focus will be on the posterior dentition, with emphasis on minimally invasive tooth preparations, adhesive protocols, and final cementation & finishing of these restorations.  

The indication and use of the Immediate Dentin Sealing (IDS) and Deep Margin Elevation (DME) will be discussed as part of the adhesive protocol of the procedure. 

The use of modern digital technologies; from digital scanning and planning, milling and 3D printing to simplify and facilitate the delivery of ceramic restorations will also be highlighted. 

Cracks affecting vital teeth (both asymptomatic and symptomatic) and the management of such presentations utilising adhesively bonded ceramic restorations will be detailed, providing guidelines for the diagnosis and management of this commonly encountered scenario in everyday practice.  

Learning Objectives: 

  • Optimal material selection for Bonded Ceramic Restorations. 
  • The role and use of IDS and DME in Bonded Posterior Ceramic Restorations. 
  • The guidelines for the use of Bonded Ceramic restorations in the management of cracks in the vital dentition. 


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